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How to Install a Push Button Ignition on Your Car

If the ignition switch on your car has gone bad, the repair can be expensive and time-consuming. Disconnect your battery. Electricity, even from a volt battery, can cause injuries and sparks can create fires. This is not a project you want to work on while the power is hooked up. Decide on the placement of your new push-button starter switch. Good locations include under the dashboard, in the center console or even in the glove compartment.

This is really a matter of personal taste and convenience. If you are just using the push button switch as a temporary fix, you don't have to actually install it. Just wrap the electrical connections in electrician's tape and lay it on top of the dashboard after everything is connected. Using your wrenches or sockets, remove the nut from the positive side stud of your starter solenoid and put it in a safe place where it won't get lost.

Crimp the connector onto the wire firmly and then slide the eyelet over the positive side stud of the solenoid and reattach the nut. Run your wire into the pasenger compartment of the car, being careful to route it in such a way that it will not come into contact with hot engine components or sharp edges that might damage the wire. Once you are in the passenger compartment and have enough wire to reach your switch's' installation location, allow an extra 3 to 4 inches and clip the wire.

Strip the insulation from the end of the wire and install a crimp connector of the appropriate size to fit on one side of your push-button switch. Remove the screw from the back of the push-button switch and attach the connector to the switch.

ignition bypass

Route this wire to the positive side of the battery. As with the last wire, be very careful to avoid engine components that may damage the wire. Reconnect the positive side of your battery with the new wire placed into position where it will get a good electrical connection. Try it out. You will still need your key to unlock the steering wheel and send power to your fuel pump and accessories. Turn the key to the on position and press the starter button to start the engine.

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Step 1 Disconnect your battery. Step 2 Decide on the placement of your new push-button starter switch. Step 3 Using your wrenches or sockets, remove the nut from the positive side stud of your starter solenoid and put it in a safe place where it won't get lost.

Step 5 Run your wire into the pasenger compartment of the car, being careful to route it in such a way that it will not come into contact with hot engine components or sharp edges that might damage the wire. Step 6 Remove the screw from the back of the push-button switch and attach the connector to the switch.

Step 8 Route this wire to the positive side of the battery. Step 9 Reconnect the negative side of your battery.

Step 10 Reconnect the positive side of your battery with the new wire placed into position where it will get a good electrical connection. Tip This setup works best in older vehichles. Newer cars with theft protection devices in place may not work with this fix without additional modifications. This is an excellent emergency fix when you are stranded and just need the car to start. Warning Make sure to disconnect the battery before starting this project to avoid injury.

Make certain that the switch you use has a minimum amperage rating of 30 amps, as anything smaller could cause fires. Don't lose your keys.Putting the key in the ignition switch and starting the car feels like second nature. However, if your car has ignition switch problemsyou may not be able to start the car at all. Ignition switch problems can also cause issues on the road, such as unexpected shutdowns or electrical problems.

Here's how to fix several common issues. The average car key only has a few hundred thousand combinations. Of course, if you access the car itself with your key, you likely won't be able to turn on the ignition because of all those extra tumblers. This has really happened, much to the chagrin of car owners and inadvertent felons.

The ignition cylinder is mechanically connected to the steering wheel lock, so a potential thief cannot steer the car without the key. If you turn off the engine with the steering wheel turned or turn the steering wheel after turning off the engine, the steering wheel lock can bind and prevent you from turning the ignition.

How To Fix It: Fortunately, this is an easy fix. Just turn the wheel back and forth until the ignition cylinder is freed.

You may insert and remove the ignition key thousands of times every year, wearing the key and tumblers ever-so-slightly every time. Heavy keychains can add more stress to the ignition cylinder, increasing wear. After a while, the key may fall out of the cylinder or be unable to turn out of the lock position.

How To Fix It: The best way to do this is to get a new lockset, with new keys and a new cylinder. You might consider getting a matched lockset that includes the door and trunk cylinders. The ignition switch itself is connected to the ignition cylinder by a shaft or lever. Inside the ignition switch, several contacts connect vital electrical systems needed to start and run the car. These generalizations, depend significantly on year, make, and model.

Worn ignition switch contacts, temperature problems, or broken springs can all cause the ignition switch to fail, preventing you from starting your car. On the road, poor ignition switch contacts could shut the engine off while driving, which could be dangerous. How To Fix It: After ensuring the rest of the electrical system is intact, such as fuses, relays, and circuits, replace the ignition switch. Modern cars with immobilizers use transponder keys to enable or disable engine starting or running.Transponder ignitions were instituted by car insurance underwriters in Germany who refused to insure German luxury cars without the manufacturer placing an electronic safeguard on the car's ignition.

The transponder sends a 30 character alpha-numeric code to the ignition that lets it know that it is okay to start the car and the proper key has been inserted. Circumnavigate this problem by bypassing your ignitions transponder completely. Purchase a bypass kit that is specific to your make and model of car or, if it will fit your particular car, a universal bypass kit. Be sure that you purchase one to either bypass the kit or one specifically made for installing a remote starter.

Following the manufacturer's instructions, link your bypass kit into your car's wiring by matching each wire by color to the corresponding ones in the car. Each make and model will have a different series of wires so be careful to follow the instructions.

Test your bypass kit by turning the key in your ignition. If it doesn't start, recheck the wiring. If you continue to have difficulty with your install, contact a reliable automotive locksmith who is associated with a professional organization such as Associated Locksmiths of America. Grasp the base of your key's head where it meets the blade with a pair of pliers.

Wiggling back and forth, free it from the key's blade. Do not grab it from the top as it will shatter the transponder inside your key's head. Bypass your ignition by placing the transponder key's head as close to the ignition as possible. Use either hot glue or velcro to attach it on the underside of the steering column.

Velcro is more convenient as it will allow you to remove the transponder when you have to leave the car in an undesirable location, or for an extended period of time. Start your car with the key's blade. You can now make inexpensive copies of your car's keys for everyday use. Step 1 Purchase a bypass kit that is specific to your make and model of car or, if it will fit your particular car, a universal bypass kit.

Step 2 Following the manufacturer's instructions, link your bypass kit into your car's wiring by matching each wire by color to the corresponding ones in the car.Reason I am doing bypass is because I removed 3 different security systems which I believe aere causing the car not to start. Question is, what gauge wire to use, 12 or 14 or…? Also, do I just run the live wire out or…? How are you doing the by-pass?

ignition bypass

The easiest way to check is by looking at the fuse that protects the system. These are assuming all the wiring is under the hood to under the dash. I always upsize the wire gauge if I have to go from under the hood to the trunk. BTW, I do hope your using fuses or fused circuits for this.

Without fuses, your looking at potential fires. Why do you need to bypass three different security systems if you are the legitimate owner? This makes you sound fishy. Fair question but no, it belongs to my ex. Reason for bypass is because it is the only reason I can think of to get the darned thing going.

Problem is, I have bitten off more than I can chew. Put in a new Starter motor and battery and no go.

GM Code 42 Electronic Spark Timing or Bypass Fault

Thanks for the heads up. Do require of me anything else that would assure you that I am not a thief? Think about it…May be an oxymoron, but it would take a stupid thief to post here. I think the big question is does a '91 Explorer actually have that many security systems? And any sort of aftermarket kill-switch type alarm should be simple enough to find and disable. What actually happens when you turn the key? On that car at least, the only security features were the ignition lock and the steering column lock.

If you are that concerned, why not report my information so law enforcement can come and check me out. This is not a site for ethics. Report me and set your mind at rest. I am reasonably certain these are securuty related but also accept it could be something else.

Things are simple when you know how. I am learning on the job as it were. Seems I am at the point to where I need to bite the bullet and take it in. One is Pro-Lock and the other is Steal Stopper. I suspect the latter may be audio related. I read this post originally but stayed out of it since it sounded a bit suspect. There are a number of possibilities but more info is needed before making a wild guess.

No idea what this 3 different security systems thing is all about but I would advise being careful about wire poking and bypassing as that can turn a minor glitch into a major one.Packaged in a custom heavy duty carrying case with vinyl inserts. The LT includes model no.

Ford Ignition Bypass Tool LT-78

Includes comprehensive instruction manual and molded case. This kit also includes tools to quickly bypass most auto alarm systems which use tubular lock keys. Carbide tip and machine tool drills included 9 pieces in molded case.

Quickly starts most GM vehicles It allows you to move about the vehicle while checking for shorts in the electrical system. You can also disconnect and reconnect power to any circuit while work is being completed in that circuit without leaving the work area. Have you ever had a blown fuse and wished you had 30 new fuses so you could keep replacing the blown fuse until you fo No damage to vehicle or steering column.

Individual Key guides are available No. The No. Non-stock itemmanufacturer drop ship. Shaft goes all the way into the handle - better leverage; safer to use. Properly heat treated bar - superior strength. Mayhew Dominator R Pry Bar - 60" Comes complete as shown with differing size Lock Pin pairs. Lock Pins slide in a milled slot which are secured in place with an Allen bolt from behind.

This allows for applicability to a wide range of sprocket sizes. The 6-piece kit allows fuel pressure to be read when an engine is inoperable.

Easy example, \

It plugs in place of the fuel pump relay and provides direct control over the fuel pump circuit in most domestic, Japanese, Korean and German applications. Features and Benefits: Actuates fuel pump when the engine is not rOffer valid online only at Cartoys. Limit 1 per customer. JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser.

ignition bypass

The UW remote start immobilizer interface module is used when installing remote start products in vehicles equipped with a transponder or RF Radio Frequency based immobilizer system. This type of system uses a small chip imbedded in the ignition key, called a transponder, to transmit a very low powered RF signal. If an attempt is made to start the vehicle and the transceiver does not receive a valid code, the ignition and sometimes the fuel systems are disabled.

The immobilizer system will then not allow the remote start to successfully start the vehicle. When the remote start system is not in use the factory immobilizer remains fully functional.

Selectable key windings provide ability to tune kit to specific transponder frequency used by different manufacturers. Simple jumper selection to tune kit for European vehicles 60 windings or domestic 18 windings Tamper prevention circuit provides ability to open keysense circuit to prevent immobilizer module from reading two RFID's at once and going into tamper mode. Works with any aftermarket remote start system. Compatible with the factory anti-theft system Maintains the integrity of the factory anti-theft system Two, jumper selectable antenna ring settings.

Compact design, easy to mount. No programming required Maintains the integrity of the factory anti-theft system. Need it installed? See our rates Visit a store. Add to Cart. Don't show this popup again. Please select all values to process the vehicle filter. See what fits your: Some items do not fit your: All items fits your: Does not fit your: Yes, this fits your:. Select Model. Select Year.The Ignition Bypass: A solution for problematic 4.

This modification is not legal for EPA regulated U. Regardless of the outcome, in the United States, it should be used only on off-road vehicles and not on emission controlled vehicles.

This material is the account of one person's experience and was generated on a vehicle that such modifications were legally permitted to be made upon. Neither the author nor ORN assume any liability from your use of this material. One of the seemingly inevitable consequences of aging in these vehicles is the ECM Electronic Control Module computer or other portions of the stepper motor controlled carburetor or the complex pulse air emissions system failing.

The performance of the vehicle can be dramatically altered by any sort of failure or even a mild degradation in the ECM or emissions system. These systems control both the ignition timing and the air to fuel ratio on these vehicles, and if either is off then a significant loss in power or overall driveability may result. In extreme cases the ignition may actually cut out completely while running or the engine may not start.

There are other reasons that this modification may need to be done as well. Any change to a different type of carburetor, or to a TBI fuel injection system such as those offered by Holley or Howell may confuse the ECM resulting in the the spark timing being off. The addition of high performance parts or engine modification such as head modifications, headers, or intake modifications may also require that this sort of modification be done because the modified engine may operate outside of the parameters for which the ECM was designed.

This modification will do two things. It will rewire the ignition wiring to be basically the same as that found in an '78 to '82 CJ with the engine, but without the computer controlled version of the Carter BBD carburetor and it will make the stock carburetor with its computer controlled stepper motor work with the rewired ignition. These instruction are based on my own personal experience and hundreds of Jeeps have been modified in this way since the first version of this modification was published.

The following steps all apply to anyone keeping the BBD carburetor. Steps one and two may be skipped by those changing to another type of carburetor or to fuel injection.

Warm up the Jeep long enough for it to be operating in closed loop mode if the ECM is still functional. Screw in the idle jets so that the needles that are controlled by the stepper motor move. The purpose of this is to fool the ECM into putting the stepper motor driven needles into the full rich position.

When this happens, you will see that the needles will be all pushed the way to the inside of the carb and the tone of the air going through the carb will get much lower and the engine will slow down and start to miss. At this point you should shut off the engine and disconnect the plug for the stepper motors on the back of the carb.

The plug stays disconnected from now on. An alternative to steps 1 and 2 is to remove the stepper motor from the back of the carburetor and fully extend the needles. Replace the stepper motor while being careful to not push the needles into the body of the stepper motor. In summary: Orange wire at the distributor connects will connect to the orange wire at the ignition module and the purple wire from distributor connects to purple wire at ignition module.

To do this you will have to pull the wires out of the split loom covering and follow them carefully. The orange and purple wires from the distributor both go into the firewall between the battery and valve cover, and there there is also an orange wire from the ignition module that goes into the firewall at the same place. Cut the two orange wires and splice them together. Cut the purple wire here as well. There is no purple wire coming out from the plug near the ignition module, so you will have to add a section of wire.

Find where the purple wire is that goes into the plug from the ignition module is, splice your new wire into that purple wire and then run the new wire up from the splice to where you cut the other purple wire and connect the new wire to the cut purple wire near the firewall. I used 16 gauge wire for the section I added and I have always used insulated spade terminals at all the connections.

A perfectionist would have soldered and used heat shrink tubing to insulate the connections.


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